CRC Publications

Welcome to the CRC Publications database. Here, you can search for and access CRC publications dating back to the 1970s, but excluding historical publications produced by the CRC for the Chesapeake Bay Program (CBP) partnership’s Scientific and Technical Advisory Committee (STAC). Historical STAC publications are archived in a separate database that can be accessed here. These include CRC-facilitated STAC Review Reports and STAC Workshop Summary reports on a wide variety of topics dating back to 1984.
 
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Re-plumbing the Chesapeake Watershed: Improving Roadside Ditch Management to Meet TMDL Water Quality Goals

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Estimating Land Management Effects on Water Quality Status and Trends

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Designing Sustainable Stream Restoration Projects within the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

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Exploring Applications of Behavioral Economics Research to Environmental Policy-making in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

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Assessing the Chesapeake Bay Forage Base: Existing Data and Research Priorities

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Plankton Monitoring Design Workshop Summary & Recommendations

As part of NOAA’s response to Executive Order 13508: Chesapeake Bay Protection and Restoration, NOAA’s Chesapeake Bay Office (NCBO) outlined several activities to support fisheries and water quality management, including a plankton monitoring program. At the request of NCBO, the Chesapeake Research Consortium (CRC) convened a Plankton Monitoring Design workshop on February 7-8, 2011 in Annapolis, Maryland. The objective of the workshop was to define the elements of a “core” tidal Chesapeake Bay Plankton Monitoring Program that addressed specific regional water quality and fisheries management needs. Although plankton monitoring programs have existed in the Chesapeake Bay since the mid-1980’s, the data have not been well integrated into fisheries and water quality management decisions. Reasons for and solutions to this disconnect were discussed during the workshop. Participants included water quality and resource managers, plankton and fisheries experts, and other individuals familiar with the plankton database and collection programs.

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Potential effects of endocrine disrupting compounds on bivalve populations in Chesapeake Bay: A review of current knowledge and assessment of research needs

Numerous compounds in the environment interfere with normal endocrine function in humans and other animals. These compounds, which include heavy metals, a wide variety of anthropogenic organic compounds, steroids and steroid-mimicking compounds, are collectively termed endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs). Over the past 20 years, research on the impacts of EDC exposure has identified a range of effects on growth, development, and reproduction in humans and wildlife. Most studies of EDC effects on wildlife have focused on vertebrates. Findings of reduced reproductive success in amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals resulting from environmental exposure to EDCs have generated considerable alarm (e.g., Colborn et al. 1996). Though less attention has been focused on invertebrates, it is clear that a wide variety of compounds introduced into the environment by humans can alter normal endocrine function in numerous taxa, affecting growth, development, and reproduction. Most widely noted in this regard has been impairment of the molt cycle in crustaceans due to insecticide exposure. Among mollusks, induction of imposex and intersex in gastropods exposed to tributyltin has been widely studied. Fewer studies have addressed effects of EDC exposure on bivalve mollusks, but there is evidence from several species that a range of compounds can affect sex determination, gonadal and gamete development, egg and sperm viability and function, and larval development. Intergenerational effects, in which exposure of one generation to EDCs reduces the survival of larvae in the next generation, have also been observed. Viewed in the context of conservation and restoration of bivalve populations already at historic low levels and facing multiple stressors (e.g., Chesapeake Bay oyster populations), environmental pollutants which reduce the reproductive success of individuals can have very pronounced effects on population dynamics. For instance, on oyster reefs where recruitment is intermittent or provided primarily by stocking with hatchery-produced juveniles, exposure to compounds which result in early maturation as females and/or reduce sperm function can lead to reduced fertilization success in the population. Unfortunately, there are large gaps in our knowledge about inputs and fates of EDCs in Chesapeake Bay, and about the impacts these pollutants have on bivalves at the individual, population, and ecosystem levels. We identify several areas in which critical information is needed to effectively evaluate the magnitude of EDC impacts on bivalves in Chesapeake Bay. Specifically, we recommend seven priority research and development needs: (1) development of an integrated database and communications structure, (2) identification of the major effects and modes of action by EDCs in native bivalves, (3) linkage of effects on individuals at specific stages in the life cycle to population and ecosystem models to evaluate larger-scale impacts of exposure, (4) identification in bivalves of biomarkers indicative of field exposure to EDCs, (5) monitoring of potential EDC source areas, (6) in situ field exposure studies, and (7) evaluation of EDC effects on bivalves exposed to multiple stresses characteristic of many Bay habitats.

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Virginia Oyster Restoration Review Workshop Summary

Chesapeake Research Consortium’s (CRC) Kevin Sellner was asked to attend a NOAA-sponsored Virginia Oyster Restoration Review workshop, assist Mr. Bill Goldsborough (Chesapeake Bay Foundation) in meeting facilitation, record comments, and derive a summary of the workshop’s presentations and open discussions. Ms. Paula Jasinski, NOAA Chesapeake Bay Office-VIMS, organized the workshop, identifying key Virginia participants from those restoring, monitoring, and managing the native oysters of Virginia. The workshop was convened at the Alumni House, William & Mary College, on March 31, 2010. The summary reflects the author’s recorded comments and presentation highlights, expanded in some cases from monitoring details received prior to the workshop. This workshop was an important initial step in developing a coordinated, consensus-derived Virginia restoration and monitoring strategy now moving forward through the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ development of a Native Oyster Restoration Plan, a NOAA-led Federal agency response to the Presidential Executive Order of 2009, Virginia’s Marine Resource Commission 2010 harvest area restoration strategy, NOAA Chesapeake Bay Office Benthic Assessment Program, and the individual efforts of several organizations including Virginia’s Chesapeake Bay Foundation office, The Nature Conservancy, and VIMS’ Mann research laboratory, Lipcius laboratory, and Wachapreague Laboratory.

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SAVe The Bay – Responsible Boating Near Submerged Aquatic Vegetation in the Chesapeake Bay – 169, College Park, MD

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Management, Policy, Science and Engineering of Nonstructural Erosion Control in the Chesapeake Bay: Proceedings of the 2006 Living Shoreline Summit